Body Modification

Tattooing is hard enough to implement with fur, but when you add in regenerative nanotechnology, body modification in general gets a bit difficult.
By default, medical microbots are set to maintain the body in peak physical health, which includes ejection of foreign bodies.  When implants such as the microbot hive that produces and maintains the microbots or a BCI are inserted they have RFID tags that the microbots are set to ignore.  Most other discrete implants like telescoping ocular lenses or ornamental piercings can be similarly tagged but more spread-out insertions require more delicate work.
It’s fairly common for parahumans to reinforce their skeletons with titanium alloys, similar to the frames that the first generation bioprinted parahumans were built around, this requires the use of specialized microbots to implement in the first place.  Once the metals are in place the patient’s symbiotic microbots need to be updated to consider the titanium reinforcement a part of the healthy body.  Similar updates can be used to allow for artistic scarification, branding, or even to incite the microbots to alter the pigmentation of one’s fur in specific patterns.
On Outworlds, many cultures practice the body modifications that can work with fur feathers or scales for the usual variety of reasons, freeze brands  are popular on worlds that can maintain the technology.  In the Federation pigment shift “tattoos” are popular in some circles, in particular among traders who like to show off their technology to Outworlders.  Some worlds feature youth countercultures who like to adopt “old-fashioned” body mods to mimic Outworlders, sometimes even inflicting scars that look “natural” if they want to look “tough.”
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